Mental Health Monday – Do One Thing

Standard

It doesn’t need to be big.

It doesn’t need to be important.

It doesn’t even need to be political.

Or public.

Do one thing for you.

This morning my intention was to attend church. I woke up too late, but…I could still take a shower and attend church on FB Live, which I did, and then I went to Starbucks.

Three small things that loom large, but that’s okay. Any one of them would have been a success.

Your one thing matters to only one person: YOU.

Remember that everyone’s goals and wins are different from everyone else’s.

Own it.

Enjoy it.

Celebrate it.

Do one thing.

Stroke Awareness Month – Diet and Healthy Lifestyle

Standard

Link: As a stroke survivor, here are some diet and healthy life suggestions from Stroke.org

In addition to this last post for this month’s awareness series, I have three other links for you to visit:

Strokes in Young Adults (recent – Luke Perry and John Singleton)
John Singleton
Luke Perry

Writing Advice – Wil Wheaton

Standard

Wil Wheaton is one of my favorite writers, nay people. I don’t agree with everything he espouses, I don’t think anyone can agree with everything anyone espouses, but we’re on the same wavelength more often than not.

He is a writer’s writer. When he finds something that works, he doesn’t hoard or hide it; he shares it with the masses and he believes you can be a good writer too.

In this blog post, he shares the three books that have made him a better writer. I have read Stephen King’s On Writing, and have highly recommended it. I now have the two other books on my to-read list because Wil’s advice is usually spot on.

And while you’re taking his writing advice, read his work as well!

Writing Memoir: All About the How (Link)

Standard

It’s that time of year for me again – the twice yearly, six week memoir writing workshop returns to my local library. If you’re interested in past prompts, just go to the left sidebar of this page and search the word, prompts, and write away.

Instead of sharing twelve weeks of our prompts with you, I thought this spring I would do something slightly different and share some advice that I’ve found helpful as well as resources and links. I will also be updating my Writer’s Resource Page in the upcoming days.

I discovered this blog from South Africa and writer, Amanda Patterson: Why Writing a Memoir is All About the How. Apart from this article, I do not know anything about any of their services and products that they have for sale.

Two of the things I took away from this was setting and timeline. These are two things that I don’t often think consciously about when writing memoir despite my wonderful teacher mentioning it fairly regularly.

30 Days of Nano – Day 10

Standard

Incentives

I’m going to presume that you’ve kept some of your Halloween candy from last week. We have a lot of the mini ones, so they’re pretty tiny.

Why don’t you reward every 2500 words with a mini candy bar? Or add a quarter to a jar, and see where you are at the end of November. Choose a word count and take a walk about the neighborhood or get an extra coffee.

My incentive is getting to read another chapter in my Neil Gaiman book, The View from the Cheap Seats.

What are some of the incentive you use when you want to write but need that extra push?

Mental Health Monday – What’s in My (Coping) Tool Kit?

Standard

I’ve posted about this subject before – twice that I could find links to, so in additon to those links below, I will also add a few things that popped into my mind (and my purse) as of this writing.

On Saturday, I reposted the making your own tool kit resource. Many of the suggestions are valid, but of course, one size does not fit all. That’s why I’ve written about and kept my own tool kits; to demonstrate what works for me in real time.

What works for you? Share it below. It might work for others. Working together and sharing resources and tools are what keeps us all moving forward.

What’s in My Personal Coping Tool Box (at the moment)?

Worry stone

Supernatural reruns on Netflix or TNT (the apps are on both my kndle and my smartphone.)

Small notebook for listmaking

A little bit of money – about $20 or a dedicated gift card

Granola bar for a burst of evergy. Avoid sugar, like candy bars or chocolate. If you avoid the sugar high, you’ll avoid the sugar crash.

Journal/Sketchbook with pen/pencil for scribbles and doodles.

Water bottle

Fold up soccer chair (in the car) so I always have a place to sit.

My Coping Tools

My Tool Kit/Grab Bag for Coping

Intentions

Standard

Last year, or maybe it was the year before, I gave up the word resolutions. The connotation of New Year’s Resolutions is the assumption that they won’t be kept. We go in thinking pessimistically and so our resolutions tend to be grandiose and next to impossible to accomplish. Then, as predicted, like clockwork or a calendar page turning, we give them up and go back to our bad habits.

I settled on goals for awhile, which was a little more proactive, and a little more doable, but for me, goals set a finite destination to what I want to acocmplish and goals wasn’t quite the word I was looking for.

My new word (third if you’re counting) for 2018 is Intention [s], either singular or plural, whichever one fits at the moment. I can wholeheartedly thank Gen Padalecki for the inspiration and the introduction to that word in this context. I must confess that I did not watch her entire vlog or read her blog for that day. As soon as I heard the word intention, I was off to the races. It hit me, inside and out, mentally and physically. That was my word, the word I’d been searching for.

So, now that we are here between the end of the third week and the end of the fourth week, not only of January, but of our new year, what are the intentions you’ve been keeping? Have you added any more since your initial goal-making or resolution claiming or habit-making or -breaking in the last three weeks?

Where do you stand? And where are you venturing? Give your intentions a thought or two, and get back to me. As this morning’s quote reminds us, writing down our goals makes them a little more tangible, and if they’re tangible, they’re doable.

Assistance, Please?

Standard

​I am currently planning on teaching a writing class for one of the local continuing education groups. I think I’m in a good place as a writer and former teacher to try this our for a semester or two, and I have several ideas on what I’d like to do. I think I have something to offer.

I also want to make sure I cover as much as expected in a first time class, so my question to you is what do you look for in a writing class or workshop?