Food, Isolation Style (Updated 4/29/20)

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Some people on Twitter, like Luis Miranda, Jr. and Chef Jose Andres have been sharing recipes online, and I will be sharing the two that I have plus adding to this post with others. I have several of my own recipes on the website; just put “recipe” in the search box and see what comes up.

First some tips that we are using in our house.

Wash fruits and vegetables really well. You should also wash the fruits that have peels that you won’t be eating because it still may have something on the outside that you don’t want on your hands or in your body.

Wash your utensils before food preparation.

Wash your hands, and then wash them again. It is equally important to dry your hands thoroughly. This is also a good year round practice.

Separate your meat, vegetable, and bread cutting boards. This is something you should do year round when there isn’t a global pandemic going on.

Grocery Stores are the Coronavirus Tipping Point

How You Should Get Food During the Pandemic (published by The Atlantic on March 14, 2020)

No, You Don’t Need to Disinfect Your Groceries. But Here’s How to Shop Safely

How to Freeze Vegetables While Preserving their Best Qualities

Hot to Make Substitutions for Spices, Herbs, Dairy, and Meat in Your Everyday Cooking

How Long are those Condiments in Your Fridge and Pantry Supposed to Last?

How Long Your Fresh Produce Will Really Last

Clicking graphic takes you to the source link.

Luis Miranda’s Mother’s Recipe for Pound Cake

Chef Jose Andres’ Recipe and Video for Fried Rice

“A Little Snack” from Chef Jose Andres using seaweed, rice, and Spanish anchovies

Chef Jose Andres #Recipesforallofus: 3 1/2 minute angel hair pasta in tomato sauce (I’m making this later in the week!)

Chef Jose Andres #Recipesforallofus: Sugar Omelettes

Chef Jose Andres Chicken and Cauliflower

Chef Jose Andres Brisket & Eggs (leftovers in the Andres’ house)

Chef Jose Andres Canned Green Pea FrittersChef Jose Andres Pasta, Eggplant, and Chickpeas

Chef Jose Andres Vegetable Lasagna (onions, eggplant, zucchini)

Chef Jose Andres’ Sausage and Cabbage

Chef Jose Andres’ Leftover Chicken with Vegetables

Chef Jose Andres’ Tuna Melt (of Sen. Mark Warner)

Chef Jose Andres Classic Spanish dish – “Migas” that uses old bread. Chef has added chorizo and grapes

Navajo Fry Bread

Crock Pot Lemon Italian Chicken with Capers

Hot Crash Potatoes

Chicken, Potatoes, and Green Beans Dinner (one pan. I made this and it was delicious!)

Disney’s Churros

Disney’s Dole Whip

Disney’s Cookie Fries

How to Cook a Ronto Wrap (Galaxy Edge at Home. YouTube Video)

Ikea’s Swedish Meatball Recipe

Apple Fritters

Three Ingredient Flourless Peanut Butter Cookies (perfect for lockdown)

Scone Recipe

Homemade Pizza Dough

Armadillo Cheesy Garlic Bread from Chrissy Teigen’s Cravings Cookbook [posted with permission]

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Found this on Facebook when my sister shared it. It’s meant for camping and to do over a campfire, but I’m planning on doing this with my kids in the oven next week! I’ll show you how it turns out after! (c)2020

If you don’t have yeast, this seems like a good substitute. I got this from a Gish group on Facebook. If you know who to credit, please let me know. (c)2020

National Tea Month – PG Tips

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​PG Tips was started in 1869 (this year is its bicentennial) by Arthur Brooke in Manchester, England. It was named for its pre-digestion properties as a digestive aid until after World War II when regulators ruled that tea did not help in digestion. The tips in the name referred to the part of the tea leaf used.

Tea in stringed bags were launched in 1985 and the current triangle/pyramid shaped bag (no strings attached) were offered in 1996.

Knowing the importance of adverts, Brooke’s slogan was released early in the history of PG Tips: 

“Good tea unites good company, exhilarates the spirits, banishes restraint from conversation and promotes the happiest purposes of social intercourse.”

Today was the first time I’ve read that slogan, and it very nicely sums up the experience of tea and sharing a cuppa.

While I was in Wales, I drank tea every morning, sometimes several times during the day. At home, I normally prepare my tea in a mug, but what I discovered in Britain was that it was so much better steeped in a pot and then poured into a warm cup. Glorious. Decadent even. I was fortunate to find a wonderful tea cottage in Llanrwst. It was set on the other side of the bridge alongside the Conwy River. It was beautiful, homey, and very tea cottage-y. I ordered white tea with scones and jam.

Tu Hwnt i’r Bont, Llanrwst. (c)2009-2019

I re-created that wonderful repast this week for my breakfast, using my last bag of PG Tips. Drinking it I realized how perfect it tasted and I’ll be going out to get some more!

Scones: Blueberry (Starbucks), Strawberry Yogurt (Starbucks), Cranberry Orange (Archer Farms) with butter, jam, marscapone, and the perfect color of PG Tips tea I have ever seen or tasted! (c)2019

I’d like to share an anecdote from when I was visiting a friend of mine. He is originally from Wales (which is relevant), but now lives in the US. I was visiting him and his roommates. He and his wife had gone to sleep, and a few of us stayed up for tea. Friend #2 set the water to boil in the kettle on the stove. We were talking and when the kettle began to whistle we ignored it, finishing up the thoughts we were making. Out of the bedroom comes British friend, says nothing to us, turns off the kettle, pours the boiling water into the waiting cups and goes back to bed. The rest of us watch this with mouths open. He did not remember doing this in the morning. The tea is strong in the British.

Every morning, he made me a cup of PG Tips with milk and sugar and I’d discover it on my bedside table. It is still one of my warmest memories.