Election Connection: 10 Weeks: 71 Days Until the Election

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I would encourage you to watch Day 1 of the RNC Convention from last night, and then rewatch clips from last week’s Democratic Convention. You can find both on C-Span or YouTube.

I would ask you to look critically at the messages being sent out, and ask yourself if this country will survive four more years of a Trump Presidency with its corruption, its lies, and its complete disregard for life.

Then, in seventy-one days (or sooner with early voting), vote as though your life (and the lives of your family and neighbors) depends on it.

Because it does.

Election Connection: 40 Weeks: Democratic Primaries

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Beginning next Monday is the first of nineteen voting days to choose the Democratic candidate for President. Voting will take place in fifty-seven primaries and caucuses from the fifty states and seven territories. What follows is all of the primary/caucus dates. Find your state, make sure you’re registered, and vote for the candidate you feel passionate about. Be part of the process; make your voice heard. Then after the Democratic National Convention in July, unify behind the candidate (more on that in later weeks) and return the country to the rule of law and common decency.

Before you review the primary schedule, visit Vote Save America. They have tips on how you can help the candidates, stop gerrymandering, volunteer, donate to the eventual nominee, check your voter registration, and other resources to make your vote count. Check them out.

February 3

Iowa (caucus) 41 delegates

February 11

New Hampshire 24 delegates

February 22

Nevada (caucus) 36 delegates

February 29

South Carolina 54 delegates

March 3 (Super Tuesday) 1344 total delegates

Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, American Samoa (caucus),

Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennesee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia

March 10 365 total delegates

Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota (firehouse caucus), Washington

Democrats Abroad voting period ends

March 14

Northern Mariana Islands (caucus) 6 delegates

March 17 577 total delegates

Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Ohio

March 24

Georgia 105 delegates

March 29

Puerto Rico 51 delegates

April 4 107 total delegates

Alaska, Hawaii, Louisianna, Wyoming

April 7

Wisconsin 84 delegates

April 28 663 total delegates

Connecticutt, Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island

May 2 46 total delegates

Guam (caucus), Kansas

May 5

Indiana 82 delegates

May 12 57 total delegates

Nebraska, West Virginia

May 19 115 total delegates

Kentucky, Oregon

June 2 215 total delegates

District of Columbia, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, South Dakota

June 6

United States Virgin Islands (caucus) 7 delegates

July 13-16

Democratic National Convention, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Clinton-Kaine 2016

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Today was a big news day on all fronts. The Republican National Convention concluded last night with its nomination of Donald J. Trump.

Jon Stewart returned to political television with a no-holds barred commentary, not just on Donald Trump but on the Republican establishment who relished in their hypocrisy and fear-mongering.

The Walking Dead dropped its season 7 teaser trailer at the San Diego Comic Con, and while of course, the trailer and the panel told us nothing of who died at the end of season 6 and Negan’s bat, it gave us so much to ponder for the next three months and one day that I can’t wait to see what’s in store for us, not to mention the horrifying new walkers previewed on Greg Nicotero’s Instagram.

Last but not least, Hillary Clinton chose Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia to run as her Vice President on the Democratic ticket.

I’ve been a fan of Tim Kaine for a long time. For some weird unknown reason, several of the Virginia politicians followed me for a short time on Twitter including the lieutenant governor under Sen. Kaine and the now governor, Terry McAuliffe.

Choosing Sen. Kaine was a good choice. He looks like a safe choice, but the reality was that Hillary Clinton had an overabundance of good choices and he may appeal to some of the moderate Republicans that were lukewarm at a Mike Pence VP.

When I heard Tom Vilsack’s name earlier this week, I knew immediately he was a red herring. Iowa. is not a state that Dems desperately need, although all states are important. He’s also too conservative for the Bernie Sanders’ supporters. WHile Tim Kaine isn’t as liberal as they might like, he appeals to several demographics across the board.

Personally, I was on Team Castro. I’ve been following Julian Castro’s career after hearing him speak at the Democratic National Convention in 2012, I believe it was.

Cory Booker and Sherrod Brown were great Progressive choices, and I’m a big fan of both, but in relinquishing their senate seats, the Republican governors in New Jersey and Ohio, respectively would have appointed someone of their own party, and we need them in the Senate.

The Senate also needs Elizabeth Warren to stay there and keep a fire lit under the Republicans.

Tim Kaine is a family man, more conservative than the rest of this list (with the exception of Vilsack), but is also progressive on issues of equal rights (LGBT+) and equal access (women’s reproduction). He speaks his mind, but does so without insults or hyperbole. He’s an optimist, which is something this country needs right now. He’s from Virginia, a southern swing state that has both liberal and conservative citizens, urban and rural areas, military and private sector and a variety of socio-economic people. It is a good state to look to for a microcosm of the country as a whole.

The most important qualification, however is would he make a good president if the need arose? Absolutely, yes.

Let. me know your thoughts on this team that really is Stronger Together. I have no qualms whatsoever at supporting them 100%.

Clinton-Kaine, 2016