Movie Wednesday – Noah

Standard

image

I was finally able to watch Noah on Netflix. About halfway through the movie, a thunderstorm and tornado warning hit my area so there was that sense-around experience. I paused the movie and hesitated briefly to look out the window at the dark sky, hoping my car windows were up, but I still pushed on through to the end of the movie.
It was still a little frightening despite knowing the end of the story, and the lasting covenant that floods would never cover the entire earth again, but in the moment it can be very anxiety inducing.

When the movie ended, so did the storm.

Coincidence? I don’t think so.

I initially hadn’t seen this movie version because I’ve avoided Biblical reinterpretations, especially of a story so well known throughout my life. I also have a terrible fear of water (among other things depicted here) and this story hits all those buttons.

I also have a dual mindset where I do believe the Biblical stories in a literal way, but I also have a scientific mind. I’m not sure that it’s possible to believe in both (I thought there was a word for that, but both my husband and I couldn’t think of what it could be) but for myself I hold those two both up as separate entities, each one held in each hand so to speak. Maybe one day I’ll figure it all out, but I imagine that’s a long time away.

MOVIE SPOILERS FOLLOW

Despite my personal baggage, I did enjoy the movie, although it was not told in exactly the way I remembered it. I found as I watched that I enjoyed recognizing where my childhood memories differed from the movie and I was able to see what was Biblical and what was changed and/or added for dramatic effect. For one thing, G-d didn’t have a speaking role. There were no conversations with Noah, but dreams that he needed to interpret. I thought Anthony Hopkins as Methuselah was perfect, but then again, it is Anthony Hopkins.

Noah’s sons were children at the start, but by the end only one of them had a wife.

There was a stowaway on board who ate meat, which might explain some of the animal extinctions that occurred for those animals that we don’t see today.

The story of the angels/watchers and their punishment and later on, their redemption was an interesting one that I hadn’t heard before.

I thought the cast was great. With such well known names, I enjoy when I notice the characters, and not the actors and this was one of those cases. I believed the story. He was Noah; not Russell Crowe playing Noah.

I’d recommend it, with the obligible grain of salt, but I also thought that it left a lot of looking inward at priorities and restarting a life that holds up to the modern viewer. It also fit in with the homily I wrote about on Sunday regarding lost and found. Noah shows that in losing parts of us, we find others and that allows us to cherish and hold close those parts (and peoples and things) that are the most important.

It was a perfect movie to watch during this watery week.

2 thoughts on “Movie Wednesday – Noah

  1. Karen, you write – “I also have a dual mindset where I do believe the Biblical stories in a literal way, but I also have a scientific mind. I’m not sure that it’s possible to believe in both (I thought there was a word for that, but both my husband and I couldn’t think of what it could be) but for myself I hold those two both up as separate entities, each one held in each hand so to speak. Maybe one day I’ll figure it all out, but I imagine that’s a long time away.”

    There is nothing to figure out, figuring out is all head stuff, and our faith, that is head, and heart, body and mind, spirit and so forth. Surrender to the mystery in the end. Figuring out is for math problems and other things where such figuring is useful.

    First of all, and I think I shared this with you as we journeyed in RCIA, but a wonderful Vatican document that everyone should read (and so few have) is Verbum Dei. Here is a link – http://www.vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/ii_vatican_council/documents/vat-ii_const_19651118_dei-verbum_en.html

    For Catholics, Scripture is never meant to be taken 100% literally in the sense that other denominations may understand it. For example, there is no way that the church asks us to believe that about 5000 or 6000 years ago, the earth was created in 7 of what we understand days as… So if you use that as a starting point, why even begin to think of this as literal? As a favorite priest of mine says, “Everything in the Bible is true… and some of it even happened.” (no -not my boss!)

    There is no either or struggle here, free yourself to the mystery and take what wisdom from it you can. And for goodness sake, let us never make science and faith opposing forces – as Catholics we have the gift of knowing that without the church, there would be no science. But that’s another story for another day!

    • Thank you for this message. I will add that to my readings. I love that particular priest’s way. This was surprising to me when I first started learning the Catechism and it was something that comforted me in my beliefs, that they weren’t faith questions as much as things I hadn’t learned yet.

      I look forward to that other day and that other story! 😉

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s